We are currently working on updating our printable list of current ferns.  Please check back soon!

Himalayan or Evergreen Maidenhair (Adiantum venustum)
8.00

This fern produces a stunning carpet of finery of brilliant soft green fronds in the early spring which mature to a bluish-green by fall and become tinged with bronze during the winter as they slowly degrade. The typical maidenhair aspect of downward curved pinnules exposes the rachis in a skeletal dark tracery above the symmetry of inverted triangles. It is known as the evergreen maidenhair since the frost bronzed fronds persist throughout the winter gradually breaking down to make way for the new reddish-tinged croziers in early spring. Failing to give this fern an early spring trim will result in a mash of old fronds crowding the fresh new ones and you'll miss the exquisite delight of sunshine illuminating those multitudinous fiddle heads. Give this fern a humus-rich root run taking care to not bury the rhizome too deeply. This is the only maidenhair I grow that thrives on being divided and is best propagated by pulling the rhizomes into small bits and planting in a loose humus rich soil.

Frond Condition:  Semi-evergreen; colonizing
Mature Height:  6-12"
Origin: Himalayan Mts. to China
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Full Shade, Partly Shaded, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist
USDA Zones:  4,5,6,7,8
Notes: Does not like areas with hot humid summers (SE U.S.), provide good drainage for best results

Tracy's Hybrid Maidenhair (Adiantum x tracyi)
10.00

Yes, it's an evergreen maidenhair!  Tracy's Hybrid Maidenhair is a naturally occurring cross between the Western Maidenhair (A. aleuticum) and the California Fan Maidenhair (A. jordanii).  While the Western Maidenhair is winter-deciduous and the California Fan Maidenhair is summer-deciduous, the hybrid they create is evergreen!  The fronds have a slightly more triangular shape than A. aleuticum, and black stipes characteristic of maidenhair ferns.

Frond Condition: Evergreen

Mature Size: 2'

Origin: Western U.S. Coastal Zones                                                    

USDA Zones: 6, 7, 8, 9

Upside Down Fern (Arachniodes standishii)
10.00

Synonym Note:  The ferns in the genus Arachniodes have had a checkered history having been linked with both Polystichum and Dryopteris as well as turning up in old floras under the genera Laestra, Aspidum, and Polystichopsis.

A. standishii is one of the most beautiful in the genus with large tri- to quadripinnate, three to four times divided, mid-green horizontally arching fronds. The short creeping rhizome is angled sideways so that the elongated triangular fronds arise in an irregular fashion. The texture of A. standishii is softer than the glossy patina that is associated with both A. aristata and A. simplicior, which is often labeled in the trade as A. aristata 'Variegata'. It has earned the nickname upside-down fern due to its unique structure of the upper surface appearing to be constructed, the pinnae and pinnule rachises prominently raised, as the lower surface would be in other ferns.  In other words, it looks like its fronds are on upside down!

Frond Condition:  Evergreen to semi-evergreen
Mature Height:  12-36" (1'-3')
Origin:  Japan, Korea, Southern China, Vietnam
Cultural Requirements: Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist
USDA Zones:  4,5,6,7,8,9
Notes: Limited stock available

Crested Maidenhair Spleenwort (Asplenium trichomanes 'Cristatum')
10.00

A crested form of our native Maidenhair Spleenwort fern!  These attractive dwarves stay rather compact and are quite striking when they emerge with their black stems and bright lime green pinnae, slowly fading to darker green as they age.  The black stems and forked, crested tips give this fern an almost sea-creature like appearance that is a great addition to any rock garden.  As with other Maidenhair Spleenworts, these ferns prefer lots of moisture with good drainage.  Due to its short stature, this fern benefits from a top dressing of light gravel or small stones to keep rain from splashing mud up on its foliage.

Frond condition: Deciduous

Mature Size: 12"

Origin: North America

Cultivation requirements: Part Sun, Shade, Moist

USDA Zones: 7, 8

Rusty Back Fern (Asplenium ceterach)
15.00

Synonym Note: Also known as Ceterach officinarium.

The furry backside of the fronds emerge silvery, then change to a rusty brown as the spores mature and dehiss.  The resulting "rusty back" is where this fern gets its common name.  These ferns are big fans of protected rocky crevices and like to stay moist but prefer not to be soggy.

Extended description coming soon!

Hart's Tongue Fern (Asplenium scolopendrium)
10.00

The English "scolly" has given rise to an amazing range of innovative forms. They all begin from this simple shiny lanceolate strap, which resembles a long, green tongue. The sausage-shaped lines of the sori bear a fanciful resemblance to the feet of a centipede, hence the species name which comes from the Greek term for that creepy crawler, "scolopendra". Site this fern in well drained yet moisture retentive soil. Found in lime rich areas, they are adaptable to acid conditions if some form of calcium is added to the soil. To keep things basic merely incorporate some small chunks of concrete rubble, crushed eggshell, or fireplace ashes in the planting area. These ferns thrive in the chinks of dry stack rock walls or tucked up under a rocky overhang. Filtered light is best to keep them a deep rich green as too much sun will yellow them.

There are many suitable companions for these ferns including such east coast natives such as Anemonella thalictroides selections and Hepatica species and cultivars. These are diploid forms from England. Although the subsp. americanum occurs in the eastern US that it is a tetraploid and, surprisingly with a doubled number of chromosomes, a much more difficult form to grow. This fern does not do well in areas with HOT, HUMID SUMMERS!

Frond Condition:  Evergreen
Mature Height:  1-2'
Origin:  England, Europe
Cultural Requirements:  Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist, Calcium* (*these ferns prefer alkaline soils; in acid environments they will greatly benefit from crushed egg shells, concrete rubble, or crushed oyster shells mixed into the soil)
USDA Zones:  6, 7, 8, 9

Crisped Hart's-Tongue Fern (Asplenium scolopendrium 'Crispum Group')
20.00

*Note: Limited availability specialty order item.  Please inquire directly via email or phone.*

These are considered the cream of the innumerable cultivars found or raised in Victorian England. This form is recorded as early as 1650 in Bauhin and Cherlet's "Historia Plantarum Universalis". There were many names applied to various nuances of this offered variaton on the simple flat planed species.  Think old fashioned ribbon candy!  All true crispums are barren in that they do not bear sori on any fronds. Propagation is from crown division or stipe bases inverted into sand or pumice which will bear bulbils with time and patience. There are fertile ruffled forms that not quite as deeply frilled which are properly placed in the 'Undulatum Group'. Many barely ruffled forms are sold under this name since growing this group from spores will yield varying degrees of frond undulation. The best forms should be sorted out and labeled as representative of this group and poor forms just simply labeled as the species. Sadly this very rarely happens and the customer is baffled to find they have been duped.

Frond Condition:  Evergreen
Mature Height:  12-24" (1-2')
Origin:  English cultivar
Cultural Requirements: Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist
USDA Zones:  6,7,8,9

Crested Hart's Tongue Fern (Asplenium scolopendrium 'Cristatum')
10.00

The term 'Cristatum' is really a blanket designation covering a wide array of various forms with divided fronds. The Victorians named every nuance of forked, fan-shaped,branched, or bunched, divisions with a descriptive Latin epithet and or finder's name. Some accounts list upwards of 350 or more named forms which are difficult to conclusively assign today. Since this species and its variable progeny are capable of tremendous innovation when raised from spores only a fraction of the sporting offspring are "true" or repeats of the original parent. In the strict sense of the Cristate section the cresting occurs in the top third of the frond and goes on to re-divide into apical crests and tassels. Many of the offspring may also include some from the Ramose Cristate section where the initial division occurs in the lower third of the frond, even as low as the stipe, as well as dividing at the apex. You will often see both types of cresting occurring on an individual frond as well as the same frond on a single plant. Size as well as degree of cresting is also variable even when sowing from a single selected form.

Frond Condition:  Evergreen
Mature Height:  12-20 inches
Origin: U.K.
Cultural Requirements:  Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist, Calcium
USDA ZoneS:  6, 7, 8, 9

Narrow Hart's Tongue Fern (Asplenium scolopendrium 'Marginatum type'
10.00

This form has a narrower blade than the typical species, giving it a seaweed like appearance. Like other tongue ferns, it prefers slightly alkaline soils to maintain a healthy green sheen.  The margins of the fronds are generally gently lobed or crenate and in the best forms there is a ridge of tissue running down the middle of the underside of the blade. The most commonly seen form in the trade is one referred to as 'Marginatum Irregulare' by the Victorians due to the uneven nature of the width and undulations of the blade margin. There is also a fimbriate form with fringe like segments on the margin. Martin Rickard's "Plant Finder's Guide to Garden Ferns" has the illustrations of these two forms switched in identity. True Crispum forms are wider ruffled similar to an Elizabethan ruff and do not produce lines of sporangia.

Frond Condition:  Evergreen
Mature Height:  6-12"
Origin:  English cultivar, UK
Cultural Requirements:  Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist, Calcium
USDA Zones6, 7, 8, 9

Maidenhair Spleenwort (Asplenium trichomanes subsp. trichomanes)
10.00

Linear fronds with 15-30 pairs of dark green pinnae are borne on slender glossy brownish-black stipes. The minutely stalked pinnae are usually asymmetric rounded oblongs with variably toothed edges. Aging fronds shed their pinnae over time while building up a persistent tuft of leafless stipes below the current year's fronds. Colonies of maidenhair spleenwort usually grow in fissures where small moss and humus accumulations provide a moisture retentive yet well drained and aerated root run. Although these rocky denizens may occur on a southerly slope they are always situated out of the direct sun, and we have found that they prefer slightly acid soils.

Frond Condition:  Evergreen
Mature Height:  6-12"
Origin:  Pacific Northwest
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist
USDA Zone:  5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Tatting Fern (Athyrium filix-femina 'Frizelliae')
10.00

One of the most charming and recognizable lady fern finds with its unique fan-shaped pinnae flared out less than 1/2 inch on either side of the rachis. Mrs. Frizell found it on her property in Ireland in 1857 where “It grew between two boulders so fast and with so little soil, that it was with great difficulty my husband removed it." These sporlings seem to be some of the best progeny I have seen of this form from spore as many irregular plants are often produced in spore lots. I can't guarantee perfection from every plant, and I have seen a few indications of apical cresting, but for the most part there seem to be no major breaks out of character. Tissue cultured plants also have the same tendency to break form so look for a plant that is consistent in character.

Frond Condition:  Deciduous
Mature Height:  6-12"
Origin:  Ireland
Cultural Requirements:  Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist
USDA Zones:  4,5,6,7,8

Japanese Lady Fern (Athyrium japonicum)
8.00

Synonyms: Black Lady Fern

Extended description coming soon!

Frond Condition: Deciduous

Origin: Asia

Japanese Lady Fern (Athyrium niponicum)
10.00

*Stock note: We are currently out of 4" starts of this fern but 6" starts are available in limited quantities for $10.00 each!*

These plants are not grown from the typical species itself but are selected reversions from A. niponicum 'Pictum' sporlings. The foliage coloration is an overall luminescent green while the stipe and rachis maintain varying degrees of burgundy coloration. The form Athyrium niponicum 'Branford Rambler' is merely a selected form of this species with good red stipe coloring and a chartreuse cast to the fronds. Some nurseries refer to this reverted green form as 'Metallicum', which is actually the name assigned by Japanese authors to painted forms. It shows you what can happen when no one bothers to actually seriously spend time to research and verify information!

Frond Condition: Deciduous
Mature Height: 12-24" (1-2')
Origin: East Asia
Cultural Requirements:  Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist
USDA Zones: 4,5,6,7,8
Notes:  colonizing (spreads via underground rhizome)

Japanese Painted Fern (Athyrium niponicum 'Pictum')
8.00

It's easy to see why Japanese Painted Ferns are a favorite for many gardeners.  Tri-color pastels, as if from an artist's palette, adorn the tri-pinnatifid (three-times-divided) fronds of this fern. Glowing burgundy stems meld into the soft green pinnae, finishing in a spray of creamy to chalky white at the edges and tips.  The long, pointed, triangular shaped 1-1 1/2' fronds tend to arch down in a pleasing cascade, making it an excellent and highly visible foreground companion for other shade and moisture-loving perennials in the garden.  Because they have a colonizing rhizome, clumps of Japanese Painted Ferns will spread in favorable conditions, and put fronds up from multiple locations rather than a central crown (caudex), making for a profuse, almost hedge-like display that is perfect for shady borders and low accents.

This cultivar exhibits a tremendous range of color and texture variation when grown from spore, and some plants will tend to be heavy on the burgundy accents, while others tend more toward chalky white tones. When selecting Japanese Painted Ferns, try to pick one whose texture and coloration is pleasing to you, since they vary somewhat!  This is all natural variation within the species cultivar. While specimens tending toward burgundy are impressive as stand-alones, or against contrasting colors of other perennials, specimens with good white coloration often show up much better in the shady, moist locations that where these ferns thrive.  Good coloration is best achieved with early morning or late afternoon dappled sun, while taking care to maintain a humus-rich moist root run.  Japanese painted ferns do not like to be dry even when they are dormant in the winter!


Frond Condition:  Deciduous; colonizing
Mature Height:  12-15"
Origin:  Japan
Cultural Requirements:  Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist
USDA Zones:  4,5,6,7,8

Auriculate Lady Fern (Athyrium oblitescens)
8.00

Formerly/Also sold as: Athyrium otophorum

Lustrous broad black scales cloak the emerging ghostly creamy yellow new croziers which elongate into chalky green spear-head shaped blades. This symmetrical vase-shaped fern with graceful arching fronds is supported by a glowing burgundy network structure. This fern will persist much longer than the Japanese painted fern into the early frosts of autumn. I was fortunate to receive spores for this population which is now being produced by commercial fern growers from Ray Coughlin. Ray and Rita had the most magical garden I have ever seen in England beginning with a pristine rock garden and extending back hundreds of yards into marvelous trees and shrubs skirted with a mind boggling collection of Victorian ferns and other rare fern species. I cherish the wonderful visits I had with them with my mentor, Jimmy Dyce, and all the fabulous fern treasures they shared with me over the years.  On a recent trip to Japan I discovered that the form commonly sold in the commerial market, once identified as A. otophorum, is actually A. oblitescens!

Frond Condition:  Deciduous
Mature Height:  1-2'
Origin:  Asia
Cultural Requirements:  Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist
USDA Zones4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Little Hard Fern (Blechnum penna-marina subsp. alpina)
10.00

It is most fortunate that a fern as striking and useful as this one is should also be so easy to grow. This compact creeper has brownish-green fronds which emerge reddish-rose in the spring and color to a chocolate in the winter. At its best with some morning or late afternoon sun, it can edge paths, crawl about the rockery, or carpet under shrubs. The fertile fronds are twice as tall as the sterile ones and look like suspended pagodas. This form seems to be in the medium range size for the species as we have a larger version as well as a wee version of this fern.  These ferns are capable of handling more sun exposure than many others, and make excellent accents near ponds or other boggy, exposed areas.

Frond Condition:  Evergreen, colonizing
Mature Height:  4-6"
Origin: New Zealand
Cultural Requirements:  Part Sun, Some Sun, Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist to Bog
USDA Zones: 7, 8

Deer Fern (Blechnum spicant)
8.00

The evergreen horizontal sterile fronds have the pinnae set as in the wide blunt teeth of a comb, but occurring on both sides of the rachis. This swirling rosette of ordered symmetry is set off by the very erect linear fertile fronds which arise from the center in mid-summer. Position these ferns in evenly moist acidic soil for best results. These Pacific Northwest natives have not done well in areas with hot humid summers. Blechnum australe is a South African hard fern that seems to take the heat a bit better and is very similar in appearance although it is a colonizer rather than a solitary clumper.

Frond Condition:  Evergreen
Mature Height:  12-24" (1-2')
Origin:  Pacific Northwest
CulturalRequirements:  Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist
USDA Zones: 7, 8, 9

King of the Male Ferns (Dryopteris affinis 'Cristata The King')
8.00

Mature specimens of this cultivar are a people magnet in the garden! This is a splendidly symmetrical cultivar in which the shapely crests help weight the large fronds in a sinuous arc. The whole frond lies on a single plane with the with the pinnae tips and apex crests fanning out along the same axis, making for an impressively structured display of forks and crests. This fine crested form found in Cornwall was considered by Victorian growers as the template of perfect cresting by which all other male fern cultivars were judged, and reaches an impressive size of up to 4 1/2'. Many Dryopteris affinis and D. filix-mas forms cultivated under high-humidity glasshouse conditions were even trained up into small tree fern like specimens!

Frond Condition:  Semi-evergreen
Mature Height:  3 - 4 1/2'
Origin: Cornwall, UK
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Full Shade, Partly Shaded, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist
USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7 ,8, 9

Recurved Golden-scaled Male Fern (Dryopteris affinis 'Revolvens')
8.00

A lovely graceful form with pinnae that curl down in a tubular fashion. This from has a lovely open urn shape if kept to one crown. I introduced this cultivar in the mid 1980's and although it has never caught on as a mainstream regular I have always loved its smaller size and graceful open vase-like shape and gentle downwardly curled foliage.

Frond Condition: Semi-evergreen
Mature Height: 2-3'
Origin: England
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist
USDA Zones: 5,6,7,8,9

Dadds' Crested Male Fern (Dryopteris affinis subsp. affinis 'Polydactyla Dadds')
10.00

Several polydactylous, or long-fingered crested types of Dryopteris affinis and its morphotypes were found in the wild, cataloged and cultivated by Victorian era fern enthusiasts.  Of the named forms, Dadds’ 1872 find has slightly thinner fronds than other types while still retaining the usual flat, spreading crests to the frond and pinnae tips.  These long fingered forms with their slender lines and light cresting are quite distinct from the cristatum types that have more bunches of fan-like crests.  The result is a beautiful spray of long, fine, outstretched tasseled fingers that make this fern a structural and elegant addition to any garden.
Frond Condition: Semi-Evergreen
Mature Height: 3-4’
Origin: Europe
Cultivation requirements: Part Sun, Part Shade, Shade, Moist to Dryish
USDA Zones: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Long-fingered Golden Scaled Male Fern (Dryopteris affinis subsp. affinis 'Polydactyla Mapplebeck')
10.00

This fern surpasses D. affinis 'Cristata The King' in sheer robust exuberance.  Mature specimens develop fronds over four and a half feet in length that arch out into an impressive splay of tassels sure to elicit exclamations of covetous admiration from garden visitors.  As the cultivar epithet "polydactyla" indicates, the crests or tassels are elongated like outstretched fingers before forking and the apex (tip of the frond) is highly divided many times into what is considered a grandiceps form that is wider than the frond structure below.  This cultivar dates back to 1862 when it was found by Mapplebeck in Westmoreland, England.  As with all the large growing cultivars of D. affinis subsp. affinis this is a fast, easy grower that is versatile from part sun to shade and moist to dryish, and from sandy to humus rich soils.                

Frond Condition:  Semi-evergreen                                                                     

Mature height: 3-4'                                                                                                

Mature frond length: 4 1/2'                                                                                  

Origin: Westmoreland, England                                                                         

Cultural Requirements: Part sun to part shade, moist to dryish                                

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Crisped Golden-scaled Male Fern (Dryopteris cambrensis 'Crispa Barnes')
8.00

Dryopteris affinis subsp. cambrensis has now been upgraded to species status from subspecies status! 'Crispa Barnes' is the proper name of this crisped cambrensis variation although we have offered it under the incomplete name of 'Crispa' in the past. However that name was applied by Victorian growers to a form similar in appearance but very dwarf. This is one of my favorite ferns with its crimped golden-green new fronds set against the lustrous orangey-brown parchment-like scales thickly clustered on the stalks. It eventually builds up so many crowns that it becomes a dome of crispy foliage looking tidy next to frothy perennals such as astilbes and corydalis. I have recently found out that a wholesale grower has been selling Dryopteris cambrensis as D.affinis 'Crispa Barnes'. I thought I had corrected this error a few years back but the problem persists. If you receive a fern with this name from another grower and the foliage is not crinkled and crispy you have the wrong plant. Please note that the the epithet cambrensis was a subspecies designation and not a cultivar name as it is so often erroneously labeled in commercial trade.

Frond Condition: Semi-evergreen
Mature Height: 2-3'
Origin: England
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist
USDA Zones: 5,6,7,8,9

Spinulose Wood or Toothed Wood Fern (Dryopteris carthusiana)
6.00

This is a fern that seems suited to almost any part of the garden with its willingness to thrive in areas with some sun to part shade from slightly moist to downright boggy. The narrowly oval blade skyrockets up from the crown making it distinct among the more relaxed habit of its other nearly tri-pinnate relatives. I find it a particularly good self-sower in my greenhouse and in its native range it is known to hybridize with other Dryopteris species. This will be listed as D. spinulosa in older floras.

Frond Condition: Deciduous
Mature Height: 2-3'
Origin: Northern North America, Europe, Asia
Cultural Requirements: Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Evenly Moist, Wet
USDA Zones: 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9

Champion's Wood Fern (Dryopteris championii)
10.00


Although this fern is a slow grower it is well worth the patience to finally have its glossy broad oval bipinnate bipinnate fronds stand steadfastly up to winter's tempestrous tantrums. The Loch Ness green pinnae contrast with the deep reddish-brown chaff that hug the stipe and rachis. The oblong lanceolate pinnules have smooth to barely lobed margins which curve down slightly except at the base where blunt dagger-like auricles overlap adjacent segments. Early morning, late afternoon, or bright filtered light and moist fluffy humus along with regular watering should keep this fern in top form.

Frond Condition:  Evergreen
Mature Height:  24-30" (2-2.5')
Origin:  Japan, Korea, China, Korea, China
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist
USDA Zones: 5,6,7,8

Hybrid Robust Male Fern (Dryopteris complexa 'Robust')
8.00

This vigorous full foliage form has graceful undulating fronds with well-developed pinnatifid pinnae that billow over one another. The weight of the substantial pinnae bows down the whole frond in a graceful arc. This is a marvelous fern for naturalizing in a woodsy setting or knitting together showy herbaceous treasures in a large scale border, since it quickly reaches proportions of up to 5 feet in favorable conditions. This fern has also been successfully used on steep hillsides and riverbanks to help retard erosion. Nearly three decades ago I naively passed this fern along to the wholesale trade under the name as I received it from the BPS spore exchange: Dryopteris filix-mas 'Undulata Robusta'. As my first crop of sporelings reached maturity in the early 1980's I realized that this form was most likely a hybrid and not just a filix-mas selected cultivar. Dr. Christopher Page verified this to be a Dryopteris x complexa (then called D. x tavelli) on a visit to our area. He felt that it was possibly a hybrid of Dryopteris filix-mas with Dryopteris affinis subsp. robusta which itself looks almost like a cross with filix-mas compared to the other affinis subspecies. Regretably, passing a fern that is mis-labeled onto a commercial grower who prints tags by the thousands meant that the wrong name has been applied to this hybrid selection for years!

Frond Condition: Sub-evergreen
Mature Height: 3-5'
Origin England, Europe
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded. Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist, Dryish
USDA Zones: 5,6,7,8,9

Crisped Narrow Hybrid Golden-scaled Male Fern (Dryopteris complexa 'Stableri Crisped')
8.00

This fern has the same four inch wide fronds of its namesake 'Stableri' but with each pinnule delicately crinkled. There is some slight variation as to the degree of crisping making it a bit difficult to determine whether to label plants as straight 'Stableri' or 'Stableri Crisped' however they are all excellent forms, and make for great accents or trellis for floppy companion plants. We received this fern from Holland under the name 'Angustata Crispata' which does not appear in any of the literature published prior to 1959, and is therefore an incorrect nomenclature. See comment about the name under Dryopteris x complexa 'Stableri' listing.

Frond Condition: Semi-evergreen
Mature Height: 3-5'
Origin: England
Cultural Requirements: Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist, Dryish
USDA Zones: 5,6,7,8,9
Notes:  Date specific origin unknown

Manta-winged Autumn Fern (Dryopteris cystolepidota [syn. nipponensis])
10.00

Synonyms/Also sold as:  Dryopteris nipponensis

Avid fern collectors might recognize this fern under its previous pseudonym, D. nipponensis. The new growth is flushed with coppery tints that soon mellow into a lovely jadeite. This is definitely a more elegant plant in the garden than autumn fern, D. erythrosora, as its widely triangular fronds seem to hover in mid-air as if they were sunset-hued manta rays gliding gracefully in the ocean tide. If you are doing well with the autumn fern you might want to try this elegant version in your garden as well.

Frond Condition: Evergreen
Mature Height: 2'
Origin: Japan and Korea
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Evenly Moist
USDA Zones: 6, 7, 8
 

Broad Buckler Fern (Dryopteris dilatata)
7.00

This is a common and generally dispersed European species which is highly variable in the wild depending on the age of the plants and the habitat they occupy.  This variability is reflected in the size, fronds outline, and degree of dissection.  The fronds average two to three feet on our stock although the Victorians recorded plants up to six feet (most likely achieved in glass enclosures).  All the various forms exhibit triangular fronds with a distinctive shuttlecock frond arrangement.  They are quick and easy growers and not at all shy about self-sowing when the conditions are favorable.

Frond Condition: Evergreen to semi-evergreen

Mature Size: 2-3’

Origin: England, Western Europe

Cultural requirements: Some Sun, Part Shade to Full Shade, Evenly Moist to Slightly Moist

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Dryopteris erythrosora (Autumn Fern)
6.00 7.00

A spectacular fern from Japan which more than lives up to its pseudonym with a sensational display of color. Exotic coppery-pink croziers unroll into pinkish honey-green fleshy fronds which mature to a rich leathery green. Cold weather brings a hint of russet to this peerless evergreen. As if all this display were not enough it produces bright red sori on the frond reverse in late summer. Most of the plants in the trade circulating as D. bissetiana, D. hondoensis, and D. purpurella are forms of D. erythrosora.

Frond Condition:  Evergreen
Mature Height:  2-3'
Origin:  Japan, Eastern Asia
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Evenly Moist
USDA Zones:  6, 7, 8, 9

Proliferous Autumn Fern (Dryopteris erythrosora variety Prolifica)
8.00

A proliferous form of the more commonly propagated Autumn Fern, variety Prolifica also sports the reddish new growth Autumn Ferns are known for.  The pinnae are reduced to a narrower outline and the habit tends to be more reclining than the species. This form lends itself to cascading over a wall, down a bank, or over the edge of a contained planting. In moderately humid conditions bulbils (baby ferns) will appear on the frond surface. This unique variety was introduced to the US by Neil Hall, while he was director of the spore exchange for the American Fern Society. Most var. prolifica being sold commercially are not true to form but are the larger reversions back along normal species lines and do not develop bulbils on the frond surface. The correct form has very narrow pinnules, produces bulblets on the pinnule edges, and is very floppy in habit.

Frond Condition: Evergreen
Mature Height: 12-15"
Origin: Japan
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Evenly Moist.
USDA Zones: 6,7,8,9

Narrow Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas 'Barnesii')
8.00

This narrowed statuesque form with slightly ruffled ovate pinnules makes a striking statement in the border or woodland vista. As with Dryopteris x complexa 'Stableri', this fern also makes excellent trellis for floppy companion plants that need support.  John Mickel reports that 'Barnesii' gets three feet tall with four inch wide fronds for east coast gardeners in his invaluable book "Ferns for American Garden".

Frond Condition: Sub-evergreen
Mature Height: 3-4'
Origin: England
Cultural Requirements:  Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist
USDA Zones: 5,6,7,8,9

Dwarf Crinkled Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas 'Crispatissima')
8.00

The pinnule margins of this charming male fern are like the short undulate of a boat wake hitting the shore. The blade is somewhat narrower than most taller varieties and quite erectly rigid in habit. As in all crisped and congested forms this is very brittle and should be kept away form high foot traffic areas. This is a cherished treasure from my mentor, the late Reginald Kaye.

Frond Condition: Deciduous                                                        

Mature Size: 12-15"                                                                        

Origin: England

Cultural Requirements: Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist

USDA Zones: 5,6,7,8,9

Crested Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas 'Cristata')
8.00

This reliable garden standard develops into a substantial clump very quickly.  Handsome carved crests are found at the frond apex and pinnae terminals in varying degrees of fullness.  This and other Male Fern forms hold up extremely well in fresh floral arrangements.

Frond Condition: Sub-evergreen

Mature Size: 2-3'

Origin: Europe

Cultural Requirments: Shade, Part Shade, Some Sun, Moist to Dryish

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

 

Grandicapital Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas 'Grandiceps Wills')
8.00

The frond apex is divided, with each division splitting again, creating a heavy bunched tassel which gracefully arches. The pinnae tips are also well tasseled with some pinnules slightly cresting as well. Place this opulent Victorian beauty amongst those gaudy English delphiniums, and overbred campanulas, for riotous visual decadence. Martin Rickard has verified that this grandiceps male fern is the very choice and much sought after.  The 'Grandiceps Wills' form was found in the wild in 1870 by J. Wills in England. 

Frond Condition: Sub-evergreen

Mature Size: 3-4'

Origin: England

Cultural Requirements: Some Shade, Partly Shaded, Full Shade, Evenly Moist, Slightly Moist

USDA Zones: 5,6,7,8,9