Scaly Buckler Fern (Dryopteris remota)

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Scaly Buckler Fern (Dryopteris remota)

8.00

Synonyms / Also Sold AS: Remote Wood Fern, Distant-leaved Buckler Fern, Scaly Buckler Fern, Hybrid European Wood Fern

This central European hybrid has widely arching blades that are a slightly ovate-lance shape with pinnae of nearly equal length, and dense, golden colored stipe scales.  However, the bottom-most pair of pinnae or basal pinnae are usually shorter than the others.  The pinnae have a hint of a lustrous sheen on the upper surface and are closely spaced with pinnules are just barely toothed, giving them a slightly lacy quality. The fronds lie in a single plane and arch gracefully in a somewhat horizontal manner.

As a hybrid, this fern has been the subject of much botanical speculation as to its true parental origins.  Suspects have included Dryopteris filix-mas crossed with D. carthuasiana and D. dilatata, and subsequent taxonomic literature suggests it is a cross between D. affinis and D. expansa.  Current speculations, as determined through cytology, morphology, chemotaxonomy and molecular genetics indicate that it is a hybrid between D. carthusiana and a missing (possibly extinct or undiscovered) taxon known as D. “semiaffinis” (BPS Fern Gazette, vol 20 Part 2, 2015).  At any rate, I was fortunate to have the opportunity to grow this from spore I obtained from the British Pteriodological Society spore exchange in the 1980s, and listed it for sale in my catalog in 1985.  It became a favorite of a good friend I shared it with, New York Botanical Garden’s John Mickel, and has proven to be another stalwart garden treasure.  Indeed, it has even become a popular fern worldwide for its consistent durability in a woodland setting, as it performs exceptionally well in areas with climatic extremes from winter cold to summer heat.

Frond Condition: Evergreen                                                                   Mature Size: 2-3’, slightly arching habit                                                 Origin: Europe; Ireland (rarely)                                                              Cultural Requirements: Part Sun to Shade, Moist to Dryish            Cultivation difficulty: Easy                                                                        USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

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